Nature Publishing Group is a division of the international scientific publishing company Springer Nature that publishes academic journals, magazines, online databases, and services in science and medicine. Nature Publishing Group's flagship publication is Nature, a weekly multidisciplinary journal first published in 1869. It also publishes Nature research journals, Nature Reviews journals (since 2000), and society-owned academic journals. Springer Nature also publishes Scientific American in 16 languages, a magazine intended for the general public. In 2013, Nature Publishing Group bought a controlling stake in Frontiers.

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Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 2 days ago

New videos detected

  • Quantum computers: Computing the impossible

    Quantum computers could crack problems that are impossible for conventional computers. But first researchers have to build one that's big enough to be useful. This animation looks at the challenges and rewards of creating a quantum computer. Read more - http://www.nature.com/nature/outline/quantum-computing Animation by Visual Science: http://www.visual-science.com Nature has full responsibil...

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 1 week ago

New videos detected

  • Portraits of a planet: Earth from space

    For centuries, we could glimpse the curvature of Earth from mountain peaks but the only way to ‘see’ our planet whole was through globes and maps. Then our world view changed. Not long after the end of World War II, scientists began experimenting with captured German V-2 rockets. They replaced the V-2 warheads with cameras and launched the rockets into near-Earth orbit, capturing the first imag...

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 1 month ago

New videos detected

  • How do you get to an exoplanet?

    Exoplanets orbit distant stars, requiring an interstellar journey to reach them. Such a journey would take tens of thousands of years with current technology, but one group thinks they could send a high-speed probe to visit our closest exoplanet. If they’re right, we could see images of this distant world within fifty years. Read the feature here: http://www.nature.com/news/what-it-would-take-to-...

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 1 month ago

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 2 months ago

New videos detected

  • Paper and string: the DIY centrifuge

    A centrifuge is a vital piece of kit for hospitals and labs across the world. But what if you could make one out of paper and string? The so-called ‘paperfuge’ is the cheapest and fastest hand-spun centrifuge ever designed — and it can reach speeds of up to 125,000 revolutions per minute. Nature Video reveals how this invention will allow basic diagnostic tests in areas without laboratory resource...

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 2 months ago

New videos detected

  • The trade routes that threaten biodiversity

    One of the major threats to biodiversity worldwide is international trade. The production of goods for export often involves logging, mining, fishing or other activities that can damage natural habitats. To figure out where the drive for these goods is coming from, researchers traced the production of goods in one country to consumers in another. The maps in this video show how consumers in the U...

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 2 months ago

New videos detected

  • Inside Alzheimer’s disease

    Our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease has come along way in the last century. In this animation, Nature Neuroscience takes us inside the brain to explore the cells, molecules and mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of this devastating condition - from the latest advances to the remaining gaps in our scientific knowledge. Nature Neuroscience has full responsibility for all editoria...

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 3 months ago

New videos detected

  • Nature Karaoke: Have Yourself a Merry Little CRISPR

    Join Nature in some end-of-year cheer with this science parody of the Christmas classic. Grab your lab-mates and have a singalong! Performed by Kim and Steve Waterman. This is an excerpt from the Nature Podcast – listen to the full end-of-year special here: http://www.nature.com/nature/podcast/index-2016-12-22.html

  • Bowel disease in the Internet age

    Sara Ringer and Dan Sharp are two young bloggers with Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). They decided to speak out about their often unseen condition to help other patients. Social media has provided a platform for advocates like them, to change the way patients can access information. But, could they also be influencing research? Find out in this Nature video. Read more: www.nature.com/ibd

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 3 months ago

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 3 months ago

New videos detected

  • Water in the shadows

    In this video we visit some of the coldest, darkest places in our Solar System: craters in the polar regions of Ceres. Ceres is the largest asteroid in the asteroid belt. New images, taken by NASA’s Dawn spacecraft, reveal water ice trapped in a few of these craters, where the Sun never shines. Ceres is now the third planetary body, after the Moon and Mercury, where water ice has been detected ...

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 4 months ago

New videos detected

  • Is a scientific career predictable?

    Research on creativity has shown that people tend to produce their most important works when they are young. This is true for scientists too. But a new study finds that this is simply because scientists are more productive in their early years. When the study's authors discounted productivity, they found that a scientist has an equally good chance of producing a high impact paper towards the end o...

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 4 months ago

Nature Publishing Group

Category: Content
Type: Youtube Video

Generated 5 months ago

New videos detected

  • Mitochondrial diseases

    Mitochondrial diseases are a group of disorders caused by genetic mutations. In this animation, Nature Video finds out how these diseases arise, and how new techniques can stop them being passed on from mother to child. To learn more about mitochondrial diseases, check out the Primer: http://www.nature.com/articles/nrdp201680 and the PrimeView: http://www.nature.com/articles/nrdp201681

  • Monkeys can make stone tools too

    Stone flakes made by capuchin monkeys look remarkably similar to stone tools made by early humans 2-3 million years ago, raising questions about the archaeological record. Read more in this news story: http://www.nature.com/news/monkey-tools-raise-questions-over-human-archaeological-record-1.20816 Read the original research paper: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature201...

  • No such animal with Dan Shechtman

    Nobel Laureate Dan Shechtman describes the structure of quasi-crystals, the discovery of which won him the scorn of colleagues in the 1980’s and then the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 2011.

  • Where to put the next billion people

    The world's population is set to increase by one billion by 2030. In this Nature Video, we take a look at where on Earth they are all going to live. Read more here: http://www.nature.com/news/where-to-put-the-next-billion-people-1.20669

  • Ain’t no stopping them now with Art McDonald

    Unstoppable by lead, undetectable above ground, undividable by modern physics; neutrinos are messengers from the very centre of the sun. Art McDonald, co-recipient of the 2015 Nobel Prize in physics, describes the puzzle of detecting neutrinos and the discovery that they change flavour on their journey to earth.

  • Tick-tock cold cold clock with Bill Phillips

    Lasers, atomic clocks, and the coolest stuff in the universe. Bill Phillips explains how laser cooling, for which he shared the 1997 Nobel Prize in physics, led to a revolution in time-keeping.

  • SPONSOR FEATURE: Food safety: the next frontier

    Mars, Incorporated and IBM Research explain how they are transforming our approach to global food safety using big data. The Consortium for Sequencing the Food Supply Chain are sequencing the genomes of millions of organisms to understand the microbiomes that exist throughout the food supply chain. With this metagenomic data, it will be possible to identify and address food safety threats on a sca...

  • Big box, small box, light-filled box with Serge Haroche

    Physicist Serge Haroche describes his work on the manipulation of quantum systems, which won him a share of the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics. A sponsor message from Mars, Incorporated – partner of the Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings – follows the credits.

  • Acoustic holograms

    Researchers can create complex patterns in air and water using ultrasonic waves. By placing 3D printed plates in front of speakers, they can levitate water droplets and propel small objects. Read more: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature19755

  • 'Try Catch Throw': a science fiction motion comic

    To celebrate 50 years of Star Trek and 150 years since the birth of H. G. Wells, Nature commissioned a short graphic novel, adapted here as a motion comic. Download the original graphic novel here: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v537/n7619/full/537259a.html More from Nature’s science fiction celebration here: http://www.nature.com/news/scifi-special-1.20529

  • Skeleton uncovered at ancient Antikythera shipwreck

    The famous shipwreck that brought us the mysterious Antikythera mechanism has revealed a new secret: a two-thousand-year-old human skeleton. The team hopes to extract DNA from the skull - a feat never attempted before on bones this old that have been underwater. Read Nature's news article here: http://www.nature.com/news/human-skeleton-found-on-famed-antikythera-shipwreck-1.20632 Read about th...

  • Rare crow shows a talent for tool use

    For decades the New Caledonian crow has taken the crown of top corvid tool-user. Now experiments on the rare Hawaiian crow, or Alala, suggest that they too could be natural tool-users. Read the full paper here: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature19103 15th September 2016

  • Five things you didn't know about H. G. Wells

    H.G. Wells is one of the most influential science fiction writers in history. In this Nature Video, we present five surprising facts about the man behind War of the Worlds.

  • Printing Lucy

    Researchers believe they've discovered how Lucy, a 3.2 million year old human relative, died. To convince others of their theory, the researchers released 3D scans of Lucy's bones. In this Nature Video we 3D print Lucy's bones to see for ourselves. Read the paper: http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/nature19332

  • The exoplanet next door

    *NOTE* This video contains an error. At 0:54 an animation representing the radial velocity method for finding exoplanets is incorrect. Here is a link to a correct representation https://www.eso.org/public/unitedkingdom/videos/eso1035g/ Astronomers have discovered evidence of a small, rocky planet orbiting our nearest star – and it may even be a bit like Earth. Nobody knows whether the planet, cal...

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