J. Paul Getty Trust

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 3 days ago

New blog articles detected

  • The Living Room War: A Conversation with Artist Martha Rosler

    Martha Rosler has been making art from a feminist perspective since before the Vietnam War, when she xeroxed her photomontages and passed them out at protests as part of the anti-war effort. In 2004, she returned to the form to protest the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. In these collages, Rosler combined idealized interiors with images evocative of war, though rarely of violence. “My intention was...

  • Behind the Scenes at the Getty Museum in 2017

    We’re less than two months into 2017, and yet already four exhibitions have opened at the Getty Museum. There is much more happening this year, but I am especially excited about three projects in particular. The Reinstallation of the Antiquities Collection at the Getty Villa—On January 3 a team at the Museum began the complex process of reinstalling the antiquities collection in the Getty Villa g...

  • Local/Global: Mapping London’s Art Market

    Our online article “Local/Global: Mapping Nineteenth-Century London’s Art Market”(1) explores the dialogue between the local and the global art markets that established a distinctive dynamic for the art world as experienced in London. Our analysis derives from two complementary datasets and visualizations. The first is an interactive map plotting the locations of major London commercial art galler...

  • The Goupil Stock Books Project

    The use of technology in a digital art history project depends on the requirements of the project at the heart of the art historian’s work. But it also needs the expertise of someone familiar with database software and analytical tools who can identify benefits and potential pitfalls of specific choices and help steer the researcher to a design that is best suited to the project. The Goupil Stock ...

  • Introducing Three Digital Art History Case Studies

    Recent years have witnessed a flourishing of activity in digital art history. Answering the question of what is digital art history is no longer a theoretical proposal; enough work has been done that we can now describe and reflect upon the field, as Pamela Fletcher did in a recent essay for caa.reviews. Tools, workshops, scholarly gatherings, online publications, and innovative analyses have cont...

  • Architecture and Maps, Databases and Archives: An Approach to Institutional History and the Built Environment in Nazi Germany

    How do art historical questions and evidence intersect with geographic concepts and digital mapping methods? This problem came into focus for us as a result of a 2007 two-week summer workshop on Holocaust Studies and Geography sponsored by the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies. From this initial meeting sprang a collaborative of nine international scholars who came together to explore the spat...

  • AUDIO: Sunil Khilnani on India’s History in Fifty Lives

    A new episode of the Art + Ideas podcast India's history is a curiously unpeopled place. As usually told it has dynasties, epochs, religions, and castes—but not that many individuals,” Sunil Khilnani writes in his book "Incarnations: India in Fifty Lives." In "Incarnations," also released as a BBC radio series and podcast, Khilnani explores how the lives of fifty Indians across 2,500 years have s...

  • Making Stories Stick on Gallery Tours

    Splitting my time between the Getty Center and Getty Villa as the 2016–17 graduate intern in Education (School Programs), I often spend my Wednesday and Thursday afternoons teaching gallery docent workshops for both new and continuing volunteer educators. Together, we explore best practices for facilitating inclusive learning opportunities, which are rooted in the belief that collaborative meaning...

  • Meet the Controversial Cupid of Eighteenth-Century France

    Be careful during your visit to the exhibition Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment. Cupid will catch you by surprise. Using the sword of his father, the god of war Mars, Cupid is cutting a bow for himself from the club of Hercules, the divine hero whom the god of love defeated by stealing his weapon. Cupid’s mischievous smile shows his satisfaction with the flexibility of this large bow,...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 week ago

New blog articles detected

  • The New Ruins of Syria

    The new online exhibition The Legacy of Ancient Palmyra presents and contextualizes historic engravings and photographs of Palmyra from the Getty Research Institute’s collection. Here archaeologist Ross Burns, who also participates in this afternoon’s panel discussion about Palmyra and Aleppo held in conjunction with the exhibition, outlines the recent destruction of cultural heritage in Syria’s c...

  • The Birth of Pastel

    Having spent two years in the Getty’s paintings department (first as a graduate intern, then as a research assistant), I was thrilled to return to the Museum last November as associate curator of drawings. Joining the drawings department has felt like coming home and embarking on a new adventure all at once, an opportunity to approach familiar artists and artworks from a fresh perspective. I’m not...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 2 weeks ago

New blog articles detected

  • Behind the Scenes and On the Stage with Joanie 4 Jackie

    Joanie 4 Jackie was an underground film network formed by artist Miranda July in 1995. For more than a decade this project fomented a generation of women filmmakers—inspiring girls to make movies for the first time, circulating work by seasoned artists to places their distributors and gallerists couldn’t reach, documenting films that hadn’t yet been made, and connecting people across the country t...

  • AUDIO: Scott Allan on Manet’s “Jeanne (Spring)”

    A new episode of the Art + Ideas podcast At the Salon of 1882, just one year before his death, Édouard Manet exhibited a painting depicting the actress and model Jeanne Demarsy. This portrait of a chic young woman holding a parasol against a background of lush foliage is viewed as a testament to Manet’s command of color and brushwork, and was one of the few resounding public and critical successe...

  • The Travel Ban Is Just Wrong

    The recent executive order barring entry into the United States from citizens of seven nations is antithetical to the values of the Getty, and we condemn it in the strongest possible terms. Curiosity, diversity, and tolerance are the core values of the humanities, values that require the free movement of people and ideas. That’s why, for years, the Getty has supported scholars, scientists and pr...

  • The Many Renaissances of Medieval Europe

    Classical antiquity was a glorious age of reason and creativity. But after the fall of Rome, Europe lapsed into a thousand years of cultural gloom, saved only by the rediscovery of ancient ideas and art in the Renaissance. Not exactly, say Getty Museum curators Kristen Collins and Kenneth Lapatin. Their exhibition Remembering Antiquity (curated with former graduate intern Rheagan Martin) combines...

  • Staging the Egyptian Harem for Western Eyes

    I first became interested in Orientalist, mainly Egyptian, photographs of the nineteenth century when I saw several original prints in the collection of Bernd Stiegler, a colleague and friend at the University of Konstanz. Intrigued, I began to study exhibition catalogues and illustrated books on the subject. The same names came up again and again as the makers of these vintage prints: the Greek B...

  • A Young Man’s Mummy Offers Clues to Cultural Exchange and Technology in Roman-Ruled Egypt

    At the Getty Villa we have an important resident on view in our galleries: a Romano-Egyptian mummy. An inscription above his feet identifies him as a Greek citizen named Herakleides. Herakleides lived in Egypt 2,000 years ago when the Romans ruled, adopting past Egyptian traditions and introducing new ones. Egypt was a melting pot of different customs and cultures, not only Romans and Greeks, but...

  • Three Graduate Interns on Installing Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment

    We three graduate interns at the Getty Museum recently participated in the installation of the exhibition Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment. We work in three related departments: Madeline in Decorative Arts and Sculpture Conservation, Hyejin in the Department of Sculpture and Decorative Arts, and Cassie in the Registrar’s Office. Here we share our reflections on what was for us a very ...

  • AUDIO: Beyond Boundaries – Visual Culture in the Provinces of Ancient Rome

    A new episode of the Art + Ideas podcast The Roman Empire’s rich and multifaceted visual culture is a manifestation of the sprawling geography of its provinces. In 2011 through the Getty Foundation’s Connecting Art Histories initiative, a group of twenty international scholars began a multi-year research seminar to study, discuss, and ponder the nature and development of art and archaeology in th...

  • The New Black

    Two recent acquisitions by the Getty Museum’s Antiquities Department look, at first glance, to be rather humble artifacts. But even these objects have stories to tell, and they repay further attention. The first is a deep drinking bowl, a shape that specialists call a “bolsal.” The term was coined by Sir John Beazley (1885–1970), the English scholar who was central to the study of ancient Greek p...

  • Why Are So Many Instagrammers Taking the Same Photo at the Getty?

    As a social media manager, I have the privilege of monitoring all of the mentions and tags of the Getty on Instagram, the modern art gallery so many of us now carry around in our pockets. Among thousands of posts each week—and I do mean thousands—I’ve noticed one image in particular that gets snapped over and over again. Sometimes when I’m walking through the museum, I actually come across people ...

  • Amplifying the Sound of Russian Futurist Poetry

    When the Getty Research Institute set out to publish Explodity, a new book about the Russian futurist poetry known as zaum, it was clear that print alone wouldn’t do the job. Zaum blends text, typography, and sound, and to “read” zaum poetry, you also have to hear it and see it. As a scholar (the book’s author, Nancy) and a digital specialist (the project manager, Alicia), we worked together to cr...

  • Edme Bouchardon’s Pocket-Sized Masterpieces

    Many visitors to the exhibition Bouchardon: Royal Artist of the Enlightenment will be intrigued by one particular red-chalk drawing. You might have already discovered it on street banners lining the streets of Los Angeles, on the Getty’s website, or on signage while visiting the Getty Center. The drawing is an unusual portrait of a young man; his eyes are closed, his head tilts downward, and he ...

  • Discovering Edible Detroit

    Last month I was in Detroit with my colleague, Getty Research Institute assistant conservator Mark Benson, to help install the Research Institute exhibition The Edible Monument in the print galleries at the Detroit Institute of Arts. The exhibition was shown at the Getty last year from October through March, and this is its second venue. It took slightly more than a full week to install the rare b...

  • Using Open-Source Software to Protect English Heritage

    The Getty Conservation Institute recently announced a new partnership with Historic England and the City of Lincoln to implement the Arches software platform, which will categorize, map, and describe the rich cultural heritage of Greater London and of Lincoln, a historic city some 140 miles to the north. Arches is an open-source, web- and geospatially-based information platform built to categoriz...

  • AUDIO: Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles, Part 4

    A new episode of the Art + Ideas podcast In a four-part series, we’ll explore architect Frank Gehry’s Los Angeles and how his practice has evolved during his seventy years as an Angeleno. In this last conversation of the series, Gehry talks about projects, past and present, in three cities: Berlin, New York, and Los Angeles. We learn about his inspiration for the Walt Disney Concert Hall and for...

  • The Bug That Had the World Seeing Red

    Once there was a color so valuable that emperors and conquistadors coveted it, and so did kings and cardinals. Artists went wild over it. Pirates ransacked ships for it. Poets from Donne to Dickinson sang its praises. Scientists vied with each other to probe its mysteries. Desperate men even risked their lives to obtain it. This highly prized commodity was the secret to the color of desire—a tin...

  • New Year, New Changes for the Getty Villa

    When the Getty Villa first opened to visitors in 1974, founder J. Paul Getty explained to the Los Angeles Times why he had chosen to base the Museum’s design on the Villa dei Papyri, a Roman villa that had been buried in the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A.D.: “It is fortunate that the United States has one ancient, private building which is authentic in spirit...One could say ‘go to Pompeii and...

  • Making the Workplace We Want

    The two of us work on digital publications and digital engagement respectively here at the Getty, but in between building books and running social media projects we often find ourselves hatching plans to increase digital literacy and joyful culture across the institution. Over the last couple years we’ve run a series of 10-minute peer-to-peer technology classes, gone semi-rogue introducing new com...

  • Illuminating Alchemy’s Colorful Peacock Stage

    It is part of the illuminated manuscript Splendor solis oder Sonnenglanz (Splendor of the Sun), one of the main works of the alchemical tradition. The original book, dated 1531 to 1532, now resides in the Berlin Kupferstichkabinett, and it formed the basis of many editions from the early sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries. The miniatures in Splendor solis are doubtless among the most beautiful...

  • Barbaric Indifference: A Conversation with Artist Alfredo Jaar

    Artist, architect, and filmmaker Alfredo Jaar is deeply concerned with global issues and social justice. He’s also interested in how mass media images travel and their effect on viewers. And how art can intervene. Jaar’s work often begins with a single real-life event, then grows with his effort to understand, reflect on and respond to it. Over the course of six years, Jaar crafted many responses...

  • A Commitment to Generosity, Inclusiveness, and Truth

    The Getty was founded on the belief that a greater appreciation of art makes the world a better place. As an art historian, I know this to be true. Art helps us to know ourselves; it fosters curiosity and empathy for people of other cultures, times, and places. It prompts us to question what is and imagine what could be. As a museum and library we are a gathering place for learning and the exchan...

  • A World War I Exhibition Finds New Meanings in France

    On September 27, 2016, the Getty Research Institute’s exhibition World War I: War of Images, Images of War opened at the Musée Würth France Erstein in the Alsatian village of Erstein, where it will be on view until January 8, 2017. This is the third venue for this exhibition, which was inaugurated at the Research Institute in November 2014 for the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War. ...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 4 months ago

New blog articles detected

  • Chat with Getty Archivists on October 5 for #AskAnArchivist Day

    The Getty Research Institute is home to millions of pages of archival material about art and the humanities, from Renaissance notebooks to contemporary art posters. A large part of the archives is historical records in the form of letters, photographs, prints, notebooks, and ephemera, but the collections also teem with fascinating objects: architectural models, woodblocks, gorilla masks, digital a...

  • Inside the Conservation Work at the Salk Institute, Louis Kahn’s Masterpiece

    The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla is one of the most architecturally significant buildings in California. The setting alone is spectacular—the institute sits on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean, on a 27-acre parcel gifted to Dr. Jonas Salk by the City of San Diego in 1960. Salk, the developer of the polio vaccine, wished to create “a collaborative environment where researc...

  • Archives Help Tell the Story of J. Paul Getty’s Life and Legacy

    How does an institution tell the story of its founder? This was the challenge a team of curators, designers, and content wranglers like myself faced as we prepared the new Getty Museum installation J. Paul Getty: Life and Legacy. While many books have been written by and about the billionaire oil tycoon who gave his name and fortune to the J. Paul Getty Trust, an engaging presentation of the man ...

  • VIDEO: The Kinora Picture Reel

    Founded in 1896, Kinora Ltd. produced some of the first motion pictures in history. It converted the Lumière brothers’ Cinématographe into a home entertainment movie machine. Printed film reels could be purchased or rented, and personal “moving portraits” could be taken in a photographic studio; in 1908, the company began offering a camera for amateur movie makers. Kinora Ltd. ceased to produce i...

  • AUDIO: A Talk with Richard Learoyd

    Photographer Richard Learoyd speaks with curator Arpad Kovacs about his work in the exhibition Richard Learoyd: In the Studio and various aspects of his photographic techniques and materials. Recorded live at the Getty Center on August 31, 2016.

  • Two “Tipsy Medievalists” Share Their Passion for Illuminated Manuscripts

    In 2013 the J. Paul Getty Museum acquired a magnificent copy of the Romance of Gillion de Trazegnies, now Ms. 111 in the Getty’s collection. In the Manuscripts Department, we’ve long been interested in experiments to engage diverse audiences with our collection. As senior curator of the collection and a specialist in Flemish illumination of that era (Elizabeth), I was particularly eager to share t...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 5 months ago

New blog articles detected

  • Different Places

    A pair of lidded bowls in the J. Paul Getty Museum have had quite an exciting existence. Though they are inanimate, we know much about the bowls’ history from research, comparison with similar objects, and visual clues on the works themselves. The large porcelain bowls and matching lids were most likely produced at a kiln in or around the Japanese town of Arita, on the southern island of Kyushu, ...

  • AUDIO: Lee Hendrix on Noir

    A new episode of the Art + Ideas podcast Technological advances in mid-19th century France saw a proliferation of black drawing media, which gave rise to unprecedented experimentation in drawing and printmaking. This episode explores the Getty exhibition "Noir: The Romance of Black in 19th-century French Drawings and Prints" with curator Lee Hendrix, who discusses how a group of artists drew insp...

  • Reflections on Performance as Vigil

    Marbles Jumbo Radio is a dancer and performance artist based in Northern California. taisha paggett invited them to collaborate on “Mountain, Fire, Holding Still.”, a performance that took place in the Getty Villa’s Outer Peristyle on August 27th. It explored blackness in antiquity and was conceived as a vigil for black lives lost to modern violence. Here, Marbles describes the process of collabor...

  • Embracing Imperfection: A Conversation with Photographer Richard Learoyd

    Working at large size—his prints are four feet wide and up to six feet tall—photographer Richard Learoyd creates striking, lifelike portraits and still lifes that reveal every pore of skin and mote of dust. “A photograph should have the ability to communicate a sense of humanity,” he says, “and it should have an internal narrative that allows you to walk away with a question or two in your mind.” ...

J. Paul Getty Trust

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 5 months ago

New blog articles detected

  • Inside the Papers of Pioneering Artist and Scholar Harmony Hammond

    In 1973 the artist, curator, and scholar Harmony Hammond made a decisive change in her professional and personal life. “I came out as a lesbian artist,” she said, “meaning the two are connected and affect each other.” A pioneer of feminist, queer, and lesbian visual culture, Hammond has led a trailblazing career, creating art, curating exhibitions, publishing extensively, and cofounding a pioneeri...

  • Spinning the Story of the Wixárika Culture

    Psychedelic drugs, anthropology, art, commerce, 1960s counterculture, and indigenous culture collide in the stunningly vibrant and intricate yarn paintings of the Wixárika people of Western Mexico. On one level, these are psychedelic works fundamentally tied to peyote, the psychotropic drug that is integral to the Wixárika’s spiritual practices. On another, they are important documentation of a cu...

  • Updating Ancient Roman Comedy for the 21st Century

    Written 2,200 years ago, Plautus’s play Mostellaria (Haunted House) has a premise that suits a movie or sitcom episode today: while his father is away, a rich young man parties nonstop, falls for a prostitute, gets into debt, and tries to dodge getting caught. The Troubadour Theater Company is performing a 21st-century version of Mostellaria, renamed Haunted House Party, at the Getty Villa through...

  • Join 10 Getty Curators for #AskACurator Day on September 14

    Ten curators from the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute are excited to meet you—and join their colleagues at nearly 1,000 institutions in 50 countries around the globe—this Wednesday, September 14, for the seventh annual #AskACurator Day. What do curators do all day? What are the most unusual or storied artworks in the collections? How do you get started in a curatorial career? How ar...

  • Talking Greco-Roman L.A. with Art Historian Peter J. Holliday

    Oscar Wilde once wrote that California is “very Italy, without the art.” As art historian Peter J. Holliday discovered in writing his new book American Arcadia: California and the Classical Tradition, ancient Greece and Rome are everywhere in our state. Consider place names like Pomona, Roman goddess of fruit, or Arcadia, verdant paradise of Virgil and Horace. Minerva, the Roman goddess of wisdom ...

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