Accessible Archives Inc.

Category: Content
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  • Irish Indentured Servants in the Colonies

    Until the late 18th century, indentured servitude was very common in British North America. It was often a way for poor Europeans to emigrate to the American colonies: they signed an indenture in return for a passage. After their indenture expired, the immigrants were free to work for themselves or another employer. In some cases, […] We hope you enjoyed Irish Indentured Servants in the Colonies....

  • President Hayes: A Lost Opportunity

    President Hayes has lost another opportunity of reminding the country of its injustice toward woman. Again a message has gone before Congress, and no mention made of the women citizens of the country. The Chinese have a saying, that “even the gods cannot help those who lose an opportunity.” Two years ago, a committee from […] We hope you enjoyed President Hayes: A Lost Opportunity. Discover more...

Accessible Archives Inc.

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 1 week ago

New blog articles detected

  • Poisoning by the Use of Hair Restorers, Head-Washes, etc…

    National Anti-Slavery Standard was the official weekly newspaper of the American Anti-Slavery Society, an abolitionist society founded in 1833 by William Lloyd Garrison and Arthur Tappan to spread their movement across the nation with printed materials. Frederick Douglass was a key leader of this society and often addressed meetings at its New York City headquarters. […] We hope you enjoyed Poiso...

  • How to Cook Potatoes in Godey’s Lady’s Book

    Godey’s Lady’s Book magazine was intended to entertain, inform and educate the women of America. In addition to extensive fashion descriptions and plates, the early issues included biographical sketches, articles about mineralogy, handcrafts, female costume, the dance, equestrienne procedures, health and hygiene, recipes and remedies and the like. Our collection provides the complete run of Godey’...

Accessible Archives Inc.

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 2 weeks ago

New blog articles detected

  • Visiting the Port of Havana in 1856

    The American going to Cuba for the first time anxiously watches for the first glimpse of the famed “gem of the Antilles.” The announcement of “land in sight,” calls him to the deck; presently there looms up upon the clear atmosphere, a number of snowy white spots, which rapidly gain solidity, and take shape. First […] We hope you enjoyed Visiting the Port of Havana in 1856. Discover more great h...

  • Julia Ward Howe’s Appeal to Womanhood

    Again, in the sight of the Christian world, have the skill and power of two great nations exhausted themselves in mutual murder. Again have the sacred questions of international justice been committed to the fatal mediation of military weapons. In this day of progress, in this century of light, the ambition of rulers has been […] We hope you enjoyed Julia Ward Howe’s Appeal to Womanhood. Discove...

Accessible Archives Inc.

Category: Content
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Generated 3 weeks ago

New blog articles detected

  • The Execution of Stephen Edwards, Spy

    One affair which caused the most intense excitement throughout old Monmouth, and elsewhere during the war of the Revolution, was the arrest, trial and execution of a young man named Stephen Edwards, on the charge of being a spy for the British. Though reference to it is rarely met with in our histories, yet there […] We hope you enjoyed The Execution of Stephen Edwards, Spy. Discover more great ...

  • Shall Our Women Vote? (1887)

    By Rev. R.Z. Roberts Whatever may be discussed through the columns of our great Church organ – the RECORDER – this is a question that all should consider. There are many spheres in life to which women have been admitted, in which she was expected to make a successful failure, but instead she has been […] We hope you enjoyed Shall Our Women Vote? (1887). Discover more great historical information...

  • “Negro Generosity” in 1790 Jamaica

    Jamaica, Feb. 5, 1790 The following are recent instances of negro generosity, notwithstanding we are too apt to consider them as mere stupid beasts of burden: An estate under a heavy mortgage was sold from its owner, who soon after died, leaving a widow, a son, and two daughters in very distressed circumstances. The negroes […] We hope you enjoyed “Negro Generosity” in 1790 Jamaica. Discover mor...

  • How to Form a Woman Suffrage Society (1880)

    First, speak with your neighbors. If they are already women of thought upon this subject the way is clear. If they are not, a few words will rouse their interest and show you they are not indifferent. Every woman wishes as good a chance for her daughter’s education as for her son’s. Every woman desires […] We hope you enjoyed How to Form a Woman Suffrage Society (1880). Discover more great histo...

  • The Colored Youth of Philadelphia (1867)

    By a Massachusetts Teacher Among many things that interested me in Philadelphia was a visit of three hours time to an institute for colored people, of which I had never heard till about a fortnight ago, when I attended its exhibition in National Hall. This institute has been in existence about ten years. It was […] We hope you enjoyed The Colored Youth of Philadelphia (1867). Discover more great...

  • Inside the Archives – Winter 2017 – Volume VI Number 1

    Winter 2017 Volume VI. Number 1. Happy New Year! Welcome to the Winter 2017 edition! 2017 is starting off to be another great year for Accessible Archives and you. Accessible Archives continues its commitment to enhancing the user experience and content of our digital collections. We will be rolling out several new products in the […] We hope you enjoyed Inside the Archives – Winter 2017 – Volume...

  • Memorable Presidential Inaugurations

    As the presidential inauguration fast approaches, let’s take a quick look back at some presidential inaugurations that were “memorable.” Frank Leslie’s Weekly provided unique reporting, complete with graphics and later photographs, of several presidential inaugurations during its publishing run. Comparing early presidential inaugurations with contemporary ones, was a common feature in Leslie’s Wee...

  • Will we see you in Atlanta at ALA Midwinter?

    Stop by  and see us at ALA Midwinter in Atlanta  – January 20-23, 2017 We will be in booth 1249 in the Georgia World Congress Center (Building A, Halls 1-3) with our exclusive sales and marketing agent, Unlimited Priorities. Every year we look forward to meeting with the dedicated folks at ALA Midwinter and showing off the […] We hope you enjoyed Will we see you in Atlanta at ALA Midwinter?. Dis...

  • The Apple-Headed Young Man

    Mrs. Stanton tells a capital story of a spruce, conceited-looking young man, with head the size of an apple, who approached her in the cars the morning after she had given one of her strong lectures. “I do not agree with your views, Madam,” said this small-headed youth, evidently thinking that his opposition would stop […] We hope you enjoyed The Apple-Headed Young Man. Discover more great histo...

  • Building of a Log Cabin in Ohio County, WV

    This description of building a log cabin appears in chapter three, Life Among the Early Settlers, in The Story of Wheeling City and Ohio County, West Virginia and Representative Citizens published in our American County Histories: West Virginia collection. The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of […]...

  • Dialogue Between a Slaveholder and the Bible

    This imagined dialogue between an American slave owner and the Bible appeared in the Frederick Douglass Paper on July 9, 1852. For Frederick Douglass’ Paper SLAVEHOLDER: I have taken you up, my friend, to find out what you really decide on the subject, so much controverted, and of so much importance to myself. Is there […] We hope you enjoyed Dialogue Between a Slaveholder and the Bible. Discove...

  • Top Ten Accessible Archives Blog Posts for 2016

    These were the top ten blog posts in terms of popularity for 2016 on the Accessible Archives blog. Accessible Archive’s diverse primary source materials reflecting broad views across American history and culture have been assembled into comprehensive databases. Developed by dedicated instructors and students of Americana, these databases allow access to the rich store of […] We hope you enjoyed T...

  • Christmas Puddings from Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1870

    Few cooks are agreed about this good old English dish, each one considering her way the best. We have carefully selected several recipes relating to these old-time puddings, from which our readers can make a selection. We know that they will have good reason to be satisfied with any of them. Plum Pudding — Beat […] We hope you enjoyed Christmas Puddings from Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1870. Discover...

  • The Meaning of Christmas

    The holiday season is upon us! Schools will be closing shortly and students will be looking forward to some time with family and friends.  I can remember when I was a child that our last class assignment before the holidays was to write a paragraph on the meaning of Christmas. Most of the students in […] We hope you enjoyed The Meaning of Christmas. Discover more great historical information at ...

  • Women Farmers in 1871

    The Revolution, a weekly women’s rights newspaper, was the official publication of the National Woman Suffrage Association formed by feminists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony to secure women’s enfranchisement through a federal constitutional amendment. Published between January 8, 1868 and February, 1872, it was edited by Stanton and Parker Pillsbury and initially funded […] We hope y...

  • New American County Histories – Fall 2016

    Most of these large volumes were published between 1870 and 1920 and have long formed the cornerstone of local historical and genealogical research. They are encyclopedic in scope and virtually limitless in their research possibilities. The full-text search capability of the American County Histories database permits the student/researcher to explore all the publications of a […] We hope you enjo...

  • Christmas Customs

    The first traces of Christmas observance found in ancient history are early in the second century, at least prior to A.D. 138. In some churches, the Epiphany and Christmas were celebrated as one festival. In the fourth century, after an elaborate investigation, the 25th of December was agreed upon, and has ever since been observed […] We hope you enjoyed Christmas Customs. Discover more great hi...

  • King George and the Indian Chiefs in London

    This report from London appeared in the December 8, 1730 issue of The Pennsylvania Gazette. September 10, 1730: Yesterday the Indian Chiefs were carried from their Lodgings in King street, Covent Garden, to the Plantation Office at Whitehill, guarded by two Files of Musketeers. When they were brought up to the Lords Commissioners, they sang […] We hope you enjoyed King George and the Indian Chief...

  • Intelligent Suffrage

    West Eau Clare, Wis., Dec. 20, 1869 DEAR REVOLUTION: The doleful condition of the enfranchised negroes suggests the question, whether when we call the ballot “the one thing needful,” we can mean any more than this. “It is that right without which there is no security for any other.” At least three other things are […] We hope you enjoyed Intelligent Suffrage. Discover more great historical infor...

  • An International Thanksgiving Day

    Not the Fourth of July, but Thanksgiving is our most distinctive national holiday. Other nations have days celebrating their birth or independence; none other has Thanksgiving. Other peoples have had harvest festivals, in joyousness similar to the day we celebrate; but no other people has ever had a distinctive day like Thanksgiving. It is a […] We hope you enjoyed An International Thanksgiving D...

  • Giving Only Eye-Service

    There is nothing more humiliating to a right-minded person than to be watched. There is nothing more annoying to an employer than the spectacle of men hard at work in his presence, but idle, or dilatory as soon as his back is turned. A man who is desirous of earning his wages works at all […] We hope you enjoyed Giving Only Eye-Service. Discover more great historical information at Accessible Ar...

  • Accessible Archives Expands 19th and 20th Century Offerings

    Malvern, PA (November 17, 2016) – Accessible Archives, Inc.®, an electronic publisher of full-text primary source historical databases, has announced additional titles in its African American Newspapers and Women’s Suffrage collections, and a new database providing access to a unique aspect of World War I. AFRICAN AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS: THE 19th CENTURY–PART XIII These publications expand […] We ho...

  • Historical Reporting on the Climate of the Hawaiian or Sandwich Islands

    Students and researchers will find the American County Histories a treasure trove of detailed information and recollections on weather and climate of a particular region.  Disasters that a region has suffered, especially violent storms, extended weather patterns and other natural disasters are well documented in these histories. Explorers, missionaries, sea captains, and settlers maintained climat...

  • Concerning Delicate Women (1869)

    One beneficial effect which I hope and expect to see as a result of the right education and ultimate enfranchisement of women is that it shall cease to be fashionable to be “delicate.” Ill health is doubtless a wide-spread curse of American women, and those who suffer from it are entitled to our most tender […] We hope you enjoyed Concerning Delicate Women (1869). Discover more great historical ...

  • When Elections are in Doubt

    The electoral process throughout American history has run its course with only a few major issues in the past 240 years. The 1876 presidential election has been used as the historical yardstick in determining the good and bad of the election process. After a hard fought campaign between Rutherford B. Hayes and Samuel J. Tilden, […] We hope you enjoyed When Elections are in Doubt. Discover more g...

  • Michigan Woman Want to Vote (1880)

    Women’s Reasons for Desiring to Vote National Citizen and Ballot Box – July 1880 The work of reading these thousands of postals and letters and selecting from among them for publication, has required the labor of two persons over two weeks, and a portion of this time three persons were engaged upon it. Although but […] We hope you enjoyed Michigan Woman Want to Vote (1880). Discover more great h...

  • Run away from the Subscriber…

    “Run away from the Subscriber…” are the five words that start hundreds of advertisements in Accessible Archives’ The Virginia Gazette,  The South Carolina Newspapers, and The Pennsylvania Gazette collections. The Virginia Gazette alone contains 2800 ads for runaway slaves, servants, and livestock.  Many are short and to the point, and some ramble on like the ad shown […] We hope you enjoyed Run a...

  • Noisy Women and Gentle Women

    I want you to tell me what you would propose should be done about those noisy, pushing women who will enter into party strifes and feuds, and, conjoined with the same kind of pushing, managing men, will manage everything, leaving the gentle, earnest ones unheard? And what about those primary meetings of which we hear […] We hope you enjoyed Noisy Women and Gentle Women. Discover more great histo...

  • Negro Suffrage in 1865

    This editorial from the American Sentinel appeared in the October 20, 1865, issue of The Liberator. Negro Suffrage One objection which is urged against permitting the negroes of the South to vote is that they are not prepared for the proper exercise of that right. Well,perhaps they are not as fully prepared as the Yankees,born […] We hope you enjoyed Negro Suffrage in 1865. Discover more great h...

  • Inside the Archives – Autumn 2016 – Volume V Number 4

    Autumn 2016 Volume V. Number 4. Welcome to the Autumn 2016 edition!  The new school year is in full swing! 2016 continues to be a great year for Accessible Archives and You. Just in time for the new school year, Accessible Archives has released our new faceted search page and increased content for the American […] We hope you enjoyed Inside the Archives – Autumn 2016 – Volume V Number 4. Discove...

  • President Grant’s “Era of Silence”

    In this day and age, every word and every sound bite from a President is captured and re-circulated through social media, broadcast and online news reports, and in print. Today’s president has a substantial communications staff. They create, manage, and collect all sorts of information. This staff impacts public perception of the president, his policies, […] We hope you enjoyed President Grant’s ...

  • Woman’s Great Needs in The Lily, October 1856

    This essay by Mrs. E. P. F. B. of Michigan appeared in the October 1856 issue of The Lily. Published in Seneca Falls, New York and priced at 50 cents a year, The Lily began as a temperance journal for “home distribution” among members of the Seneca Falls Ladies Temperance Society. Although women’s exclusion from […] We hope you enjoyed Woman’s Great Needs in The Lily, October 1856. Discover more...

  • A Look Inside the History of Adair County, Missouri

    County histories have long formed the cornerstone of local historical and genealogical research. Encyclopedic in scope and virtually limitless in their research possibilities, they provide a wealth of information for researchers of all types as well as for general interest readers.  Our American County Histories Collection is rapidly expanding to cover the early history of […] We hope you enjoyed...

  • The Political Power of Slave Masters (1848)

    This report appeared in Frederick Douglass’s The North Star on October 20, 1848. In 1847, with Douglass and M.R. Delaney as editors, The North Star was established: “…It has long been our anxious wish to see, in this slave-holding, slave-trading, and negro-hating land, a printing-press and paper, permanently established, under the complete control and direction of the immediate […] We hope you en...

  • Rules for Kings in 1773

    The Virginia Gazette was the first newspaper published in Virginia and the first to be published in the area south of the Potomac River in the colonial period of the United States. Issues have the following subtitle: “Containing the freshest advices, foreign and domestick.” Rules for Kings The conceptions of Kings are commonly as far […] We hope you enjoyed Rules for Kings in 1773. Discover more...

  • Lucy Brand: The First Woman Voter of New York

    The National Citizen and Ballot Box was a monthly journal deeply involved in the roots of the American feminist movement. It was owned and edited by Matilda Joslyn Gage, American women’s rights advocate, who helped to lead and publicize the suffrage movement in the United States. Lucy Brand Votes How she Heard the News. How […] We hope you enjoyed Lucy Brand: The First Woman Voter of New York. D...

Accessible Archives Inc.

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 5 months ago

New blog articles detected

  • Northern Opposition to the Underground Railroad

    The Underground Railroad consisted of a collection of secret routes and safe houses used by 19th-century enslaved American people to escape to free states and Canada with the aid of abolitionists and allies who were sympathetic to their cause. Several earlier (pre-Revolutionary War) routes existed for getting slaves away, but the network now generally known […] We hope you enjoyed Northern Opposi...

  • Godey’s Presidential Profiles: John Quincy Adams

    Louis A. Godey established Godey’s Lady’s Book in 1830 in Philadelphia. Initially, it included mainly articles clipped from British women’s magazines and hand-coloured plates reproducing fashions of the day. Wanting to provide more original content by American authors, Godey bought the Boston Ladies’ Magazine in January 1837 and invited its editor, Sarah Josepha Hale, to […] We hope you enjoyed G...

  • College Football’s Call to the Millions

    College football season is upon us and many will be sitting in the stands or watching the televised play-by-play — a great diversion from the ongoing political battles in this election year. Much has changed in college football since the early days of “mob ball” in the early 19th century. It was not until the […] We hope you enjoyed College Football’s Call to the Millions. Discover more great hi...

Accessible Archives Inc.

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 5 months ago

New blog articles detected

  • Elizabeth Cady Stanton: Saving our Young Girls

    The Revolution, a weekly women’s rights newspaper, was the official publication of the National Woman Suffrage Association formed by feminists Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony to secure women’s enfranchisement through a federal constitutional amendment. Published between January 8, 1868 and February, 1872, The Revolution was edited by Stanton and Parker Pillsbury. Our Young […] We hope...

  • A Local View on America in the World War I Era

    World War I greatly impacted all levels of American society. Industrial production increased, employment rose dramatically along with incomes, and cities and counties flourished. The Great Migration of African-Americans from the south to northern manufacturing cities reached its peak and when the U.S. entered the war, factories turned to women as a labor source. During […] We hope you enjoyed A L...

Accessible Archives Inc.

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 5 months ago

New blog articles detected

  • The Relation of Education and the Gospel

    The Christian Recorder was first published in 1854 under the editorship of the Rev. J.P. Campbell. This early edition was short-lived, however, and in 1861, under the editorship of Elisha Weaver, the New Series, Volume 1 began. Under this new leadership the Recorder was introduced into the South by distribution among the negro regiments in […] We hope you enjoyed The Relation of Education and the...

  • Philadelphia Welcomes President Washington

    In September of 1790, President George Washington visited Philadelphia on his way south from New York City. This report about a gathering in his honor appeared in the September 8, 1790 issue of The Pennsylvania Gazette. A Repast and Toast Thursday last about two o’clock arrived in town from New York, the President of the […] We hope you enjoyed Philadelphia Welcomes President Washington. Discove...

Accessible Archives Inc.

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 5 months ago

Accessible Archives Inc.

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 5 months ago

Accessible Archives Inc.

Category: Content
Type: Blog Article

Generated 6 months ago

New blog posts detected

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