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Announcing $5M in Funding & Crayon's Next Chapter: Actionable Market Intelligence for Every Employee

I’m thrilled to announce that Crayon has raised $5M in new funding in a round led by Steve Anderson at Baseline Ventures, with participation from existing investor and board member Eric Paley at Founder Collective, Maia Heymann at Converge, and notable angel investors.

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Competitive Analysis Requires Benchmarking Your Own Company

Competitive analysis should be an integral part of every business’ strategy. Earlier this year, we conducted a survey and published the 2018 State of Market Intelligence Report to uncover how businesses are analyzing their competitive landscape. It was encouraging to find that 82% of people are tracking their own company alongside their competitors. This may seem like a high percentage, but truthfully, the number should be 100% - every company should be tracking themselves alongside their competition. Let’s take a look at the value tracking yourself can bring to your competitive strategy.

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Should Product Marketing Report Into Marketing or Product?

productmarketing-1.pngProduct Marketing is a function so interconnected with multiple departments that, from company to company, it can even report into different teams altogether. Product Marketing - as its name indicates - is closely connected with both the Product and Marketing organizations. Factors like industry, company culture, and the specific leaders in the organization can play a role in where and how the team is structured. Where is the right fit and why? I turned to Marketing, Product, and C-level executives to get their take.

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Amazon's Job Description Gave Away Strategic Plans -- What Can You Learn About Your Market's Competitive Strategy from Job Posts?

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Companies can be plenty secretive about their sales numbers, product roadmaps, and go-to-market strategies, but frequently lay out these details in plain sight: in job descriptions. Last week, Amazon showed us exactly that: a now-deleted job posting revealed a new business line, “Whole Foods Pickup on Prime Now,” a grocery pickup option to complement their recently-launched Whole Foods delivery service. The job description, for a finance manager, noted the role would be responsible for building out “the Whole Foods delivery and pick-up service on the ultra-fast Prime Now app and enable our Prime customers to shop from a set of marquee third party retailers.”

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